The Geeking Man

Ask me anything   Keep Calm and Geek On

twitter.com/TheGeekingMan:

    Facebook Data Scientists Prove Memes Mutate And Adapt Like DNA:

Malcom Gladwell likened memes to genes, but a new study by Facebook shows just how accurate that analogy is. Memes adapt to their surroundings in order to survive, just like organisms. Post a liberal meme saying no one should die for lack of healthcare, and conservatives will mutate it to say no one should die because Obamacare rations their healthcare. And nerds will make it about Star Wars.

    Facebook Data Scientists Prove Memes Mutate And Adapt Like DNA:

    Malcom Gladwell likened memes to genes, but a new study by Facebook shows just how accurate that analogy is. Memes adapt to their surroundings in order to survive, just like organisms. Post a liberal meme saying no one should die for lack of healthcare, and conservatives will mutate it to say no one should die because Obamacare rations their healthcare. And nerds will make it about Star Wars.

    — 3 months ago with 1 note
    #technology  #geek  #facebook data  #facebook  #social media  #memes  #DNA  #Meme genes 
    This kid is four parts ballerina, six parts dodgeball extraordinaire.

    This kid is four parts ballerina, six parts dodgeball extraordinaire.

    — 3 months ago with 11 notes
    #lol  #gif  #funny  #ballerina  #geeky thing 
    (via We’re live-blogging Kaz Hirai’s CES keynote, don’t miss it!)
The Arctic ice cap shrank so much this summer that waves briefly lapped along two long-imagined Arctic shipping routes, the Northwest Passage over Canada and the Northern Sea Route over Russia.

    (via We’re live-blogging Kaz Hirai’s CES keynote, don’t miss it!)

    The Arctic ice cap shrank so much this summer that waves briefly lapped along two long-imagined Arctic shipping routes, the Northwest Passage over Canada and the Northern Sea Route over Russia.

    — 3 months ago with 3 notes
    #Technology  #geek  #keynote  #CES  #sony 
    Hands on Pebble!!!
The striking Pebble Steel could change your mind about smartwatches
The $249 second-generation Pebble adds style to the original’s substance

    Hands on Pebble!!!

    The striking Pebble Steel could change your mind about smartwatches

    The $249 second-generation Pebble adds style to the original’s substance

    — 3 months ago with 1 note
    #smartwatch  #pebble  #design  #watches 

    Hand Warmer Mug:

    Innovative coffee mug designed by Sabrina Fossi will keep your hands warm during the cold winter days.

    Ergonomic handle keeps in the heat and makes sure that your drink and your hands stay warm.

    Beautiful mugs are handmade in the Ceramic District of Montelupo, Italy.

    Enjoy coffee, tea, and delicious hot chocolate.

    — 3 months ago with 1 note
    #geek  #tea cup  #mug  #design  #creativity  #coffee mug 
    new-aesthetic:

A new question for the jury: Did my brain implant make me do it? « The Jury Room

We’ve written as lot about “brain malfunction” [aka “did my brain make me do it?”] defenses here but this is a new twist on the neurolaw question. Deep brain stimulation (“DBS”) is a well-accepted treatment for a number of serious and treatment resistant neurological conditions from Parkinson’s Disease to depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. As effective as DBS can be, there are also concerns about how, in some patients, it changes one’s personality to cause “undesirable or even deviant behavior”. The behavioral/personality changes depend on the location of the deep brain stimulation (and the functions carried out by that portion of the brain). 
So. You have a condition for which everyday treatment is ineffective or causes side-effects worse than the condition itself. Your doctor suggests a brain implant to offer deep brain stimulation (DBS). You are unfortunately, one of those for whom DBS creates behavioral reactions and you do something illegal. Are you responsible? Or is it your brain implant? […]
The article is very complex and the ideas in it are provocative. We cannot do justice to the questions raised by these writers in a brief blog post. It’s a very serious question.
"When you agree to a cutting-edge treatment and you are informed that for some people, behavioral changes may occur, do you thereby accept responsibility for any actions you take under the influence of that treatment?
"Or, since the behavior is completely different than anything you have previously displayed  and is thus believed due to the treatment (which can be shut off) is it fair to deny responsibility?
"And if you encounter aberrant behavioral effects but decide to not shut off the DBS because you appreciate the ways in which it helps you function, are you then more responsible for any illegal act you committed since you are choosing to continue down the same path?"
Yes. This is a new question. Not, “did my brain make me do it?” but “did my brain implant make me do it?”. Ultimately, however, the larger question remains the same. Where does our personal responsibility end?

    new-aesthetic:

    A new question for the jury: Did my brain implant make me do it? « The Jury Room

    We’ve written as lot about “brain malfunction” [aka “did my brain make me do it?”] defenses here but this is a new twist on the neurolaw question. Deep brain stimulation (“DBS”) is a well-accepted treatment for a number of serious and treatment resistant neurological conditions from Parkinson’s Disease to depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. As effective as DBS can be, there are also concerns about how, in some patients, it changes one’s personality to cause “undesirable or even deviant behavior”. The behavioral/personality changes depend on the location of the deep brain stimulation (and the functions carried out by that portion of the brain). 

    So. You have a condition for which everyday treatment is ineffective or causes side-effects worse than the condition itself. Your doctor suggests a brain implant to offer deep brain stimulation (DBS). You are unfortunately, one of those for whom DBS creates behavioral reactions and you do something illegal. Are you responsible? Or is it your brain implant? […]

    The article is very complex and the ideas in it are provocative. We cannot do justice to the questions raised by these writers in a brief blog post. It’s a very serious question.

    "When you agree to a cutting-edge treatment and you are informed that for some people, behavioral changes may occur, do you thereby accept responsibility for any actions you take under the influence of that treatment?

    "Or, since the behavior is completely different than anything you have previously displayed  and is thus believed due to the treatment (which can be shut off) is it fair to deny responsibility?

    "And if you encounter aberrant behavioral effects but decide to not shut off the DBS because you appreciate the ways in which it helps you function, are you then more responsible for any illegal act you committed since you are choosing to continue down the same path?"

    Yes. This is a new question. Not, “did my brain make me do it?” but “did my brain implant make me do it?”. Ultimately, however, the larger question remains the same. Where does our personal responsibility end?

    (via futurescope)

    — 3 months ago with 329 notes
    #implant  #future  #future tech  #technology  #geek 
    (via Gorilla Glass By Corning Gets Additional Futuristic Features)
If you haven’t heard of Gorilla Glass before, this might possibly change your perspective when it comes to smartphones. Gorilla Glass by Corningis a touchscreen glass which is in constant development. There was huge hype about it some time ago because of its increased durability. It is proven to be one of the most durable types of glass ever to grace a smartphone. But that’s not all that the people over at Corning have planned for this amazing piece of innovation.

    (via Gorilla Glass By Corning Gets Additional Futuristic Features)

    If you haven’t heard of Gorilla Glass before, this might possibly change your perspective when it comes to smartphones. Gorilla Glass by Corningis a touchscreen glass which is in constant development. There was huge hype about it some time ago because of its increased durability. It is proven to be one of the most durable types of glass ever to grace a smartphone. But that’s not all that the people over at Corning have planned for this amazing piece of innovation.

    — 3 months ago with 1 note
    #geek  #technology  #gadgets  #smartphones  #gorilla glass  #touchscreen  #innovation